How to Treat Postpartum Haemorrhage?

  • January 03, 2024
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How to Treat Postpartum Haemorrhage?

What is Postpartum Hemorrhage (PPH)?

Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a severe bleeding complication occurring within 24 hours to 12 weeks post-childbirth, exceeding 32 fluid ounces of blood loss. Whether from vaginal delivery or Cesarean section, PPH poses a significant risk, demanding immediate intervention. Causes include uterine atony, trauma, retained placental tissue, and coagulation disorders. Recognizing symptoms early, such as changes in heart rate or blood pressure, is crucial for prompt treatment. Interventions range from uterine massage and medications to surgical procedures and blood transfusions. Early detection and intervention are vital to prevent life-threatening consequences, ensuring the well-being of the mother during the critical postpartum period.

Why Does Postpartum Hemorrhage Occur?

Several factors contribute to postpartum hemorrhage, including uterine atony, trauma, retained placental tissue, and coagulation disorders. Uterine atony, the inability of the uterus to contract adequately after childbirth, is the leading cause of PPH. Trauma during delivery, such as tears or lacerations, can also lead to uncontrolled bleeding. Retained placental tissue hinders the normal contraction of the uterus, further exacerbating the risk of hemorrhage.